Why Does My Bike Tire Keep losing Air And No Hole?

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My bike tire lost air but there’s no hole or puncture in it. What could be wrong? It sounds like the valve stem may have come off, or the valve core is defective.

Other possibilities: A nail got stuck in your tire and you didn’t notice it, or your tire was over-inflated and now has too much air pushed out of it.

If you put air in your tire, the inside wall should bulge a bit and the tire should hold air long enough to ride home unless you’re racing.

If the bulge doesn’t go back down then your tire is flat. More likely, the tire didn’t fill all of its volumes when it lost air, so it’s not finished inflating. That usually happens when a little street bike takes off from a stop sign or does a wheelie at speed.

How to Adjust a Bicycle Inner Tube

I have a flat tire and the valve stem is broken. The shop says I need to take the tire off and buy a new one. What do you suggest?

First, take your bike to the shop and ask them what they’d charge for replacing your tube. Then question them why they can’t repair it! If you own your bike, leave it there until you can get it home, then look at it yourself.

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You don’t have to take the tire off for a small hole in the tire. Pull the valve stem out of the rim about 1/8” and let a second person hold it while you pump air into your tube from your bike pump. (I have someone hold it while I watch TV, but you can also use a bungee cord.)

The tire should fill up and hold air. If it doesn’t, or if you have a long slow leak, try injecting soapy water into the tube and look for bubbles. If the bubbles are in the sidewall of the tube, then you may have a puncture.

If you have a small hole, there will be air coming out and a little liquid too. We can’t fix it if we don’t know what’s wrong!

Pull out your tire repair kit with all sorts of tools and see if you can find what’s draining air. Look in the sidewall for an air vent. If you don’t see one, then you have to pump a little air into it to see bubbles.

If you have no hole, more likely than not all that air has just been forced out of your tube and it will hold air on its own.

Because you don’t have to take off the tire, you can do this without stopping for a long period of time and make sure everything is OK before leaving. You can also do it on the road. Just pump and pump air in till you get bubbles.

If your tube has a hole in the sidewall, then that’s what’s leaking air. The patch kit will include a plastic patch that fits over the hole and patches from outside the tube to inside, sealing it from re-inflating air.

If you have a long slow leak, then most of it is coming through the hole and you should check for holes in your tire first.

If you don’t want to fix it yourself, take your bike back to the shop and ask them why they recommend a new tube.

If you have a long slow leak, then most of it is coming through the hole and you should check for holes in your tire first.

How to Repair a Flat Tire at Home

I have a flat tire on my bike but I really don’t want to go buy a new tube yet. (I don’t want to keep riding with a flat, but it’s not that bad.) What do you suggest?

Once you’re home, pull out your tire repair kit with all sorts of tools and see if you can find what’s draining air. Look in the sidewall for an air vent. If you don’t see one, then you have to pump a little air into it to see bubbles.

If you have no hole, more likely than not all that air has just been forced out of your tube and it will hold air on its own.

Bike Tire Losing Air No Hole – Conclusion

Flat tires are no fun and can be dangerous. There are a few things that you can do to help yourself if you’re in a bad situation. Just follow the guides mentioned above!

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